44 Facts About Ed Pastor

1. Ed Pastor is pro-choice and in 2006 supported the interests of the Planned Parenthood 100 percent, according to their records.

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2. Ed Pastor is one of the most liberal members of the House, and was a founding member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

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3. In 1991, Ed Pastor won a special election to succeed 28-year incumbent Democrat Mo Udall in the 2nd District.

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4. In 1976, Ed Pastor was elected to the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, and he served three terms in this role as a county executive.

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5. Ed Pastor was born in Claypool, Arizona as the oldest of three children.

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6. Ed Pastor voted with the Democratic Party 94.5 percent of the time, which ranked 132nd among the 201 House Democratic members as of June 2013.

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7. Ed Pastor voted with the Democratic Party 91.9 percent of the time, which ranked 132nd among the 204 House Democratic members as of July 2014.

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8. Ed Pastor paid his congressional staff a total of $757,011 in 2011.

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9. Ed Pastor ranked as the 180th most wealthy representative in 2012.

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10. On September 24, 1991, Ed Pastor won election to the United States House.

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11. On November 3, 1992, Ed Pastor won election to the United States House.

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12. On November 8, 1994, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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13. On November 5, 1996, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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14. On November 3, 1998, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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15. On November 7, 2000, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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16. On November 5, 2002, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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17. On November 2, 2004, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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18. On November 7, 2006, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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19. On November 4, 2008, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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20. On November 2, 2010, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House.

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21. Ed Pastor won re-election in the 2012 election for the US House, representing Arizona's 7th District.

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22. Ed Pastor chose to retire rather than seek re-election in 2014.

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23. Ed Pastor joined with the majority of the Democratic party and voted in favor of the bill.

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24. Ed Pastor was first elected to the House in 1991 and did not seek re-election in 2014.

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25. Ed Pastor was a Democratic member of the US House representing Arizona's 7th Congressional District from 1991 to 2015.

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26. Ed Pastor was founding member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, is pro-choice, and in 2006 supported the interests of the Planned Parenthood 100 percent, according to their records.

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27. Ed Pastor is one of the nine Chief Deputy Whips for the Democratic Caucus.

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28. Ed Pastor continued his support, rebuffing attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

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29. In 1976, Ed Pastor—seeking to build on his time with the governor's office—won election as a Democrat to the Maricopa County board of supervisors.

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30. Ed Pastor married Verma Mendez, and they had two daughters, Laura and Yvonne.

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31. Ed Pastor was born in Claypool, Arizona, a small mining town about 100 miles east of Phoenix, where his father worked in the copper mines.

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32. Ed Pastor told his staff his office did appropriations, Herrera said.

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33. At the time of his retirement, Ed Pastor was the most senior member of Arizona's House delegation and served on the powerful House Appropriations Committee.

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34. In 2014, Ed Pastor received the University Medal of Excellence, considered one of ASU's most prestigious honors, at the fall undergraduate commencement.

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35. Ed Pastor was elected to Congress in 1991 and served until he declined to seek re-election and retired in 2015.

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36. In 2014, Ed Pastor told The Republic of several key Arizona projects that he played an instrumental role in funding.

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37. Ed Pastor was married to Verma Mendez for 53 years and had two daughters.

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38. In February 2014, Ed Pastor announced that he would not seek reelection and would instead retire upon the completion of his term.

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39. Around the mid-1990s, Ed Pastor was backed by the Americans for the Arts Action Fund.

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40. Ed Pastor was supported by the Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund, which works to protect native wildlife and wild areas.

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41. In 2011, Ed Pastor voted against the National Right to Carry Reciprocity Act of 2011.

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42. Ed Pastor was one of the nine Chief Deputy Whips for the Democratic Caucus.

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43. In 1976, Ed Pastor was elected to the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, and he served three terms in that role as a county executive.

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44. Ed Pastor was born in Claypool, Arizona, as the oldest of three children.

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