67 Facts About Louise Slaughter

1. In 2007, New York Congresswoman Louise Slaughter became the first woman to chair the Rules Committee.

FactSnippet No. 153,274

2. Louise Slaughter claimed in a tweet that ending DACA would be bad for business.

FactSnippet No. 153,268

3. Louise Slaughter had been hospitalized just two days ago after suffering a concussion in a fall at her Washington, DC residence.

FactSnippet No. 153,267

4. New York Congresswoman Louise Slaughter has died at the age of 88.

FactSnippet No. 153,266

5. Louise Slaughter was the primary sponsor of 12 bills that were enacted.

FactSnippet No. 153,262

6. Louise Slaughter is shown as a purple triangle ▲ in our ideology-leadership chart below.

FactSnippet No. 153,261

7. Louise Slaughter managed a one-point victory in the 1986 midterm election.

FactSnippet No. 153,258

8. Louise Slaughter had two brothers, Philip and David as well as two sisters, Marjorie and Virginia.

FactSnippet No. 153,257

9. Louise Slaughter was born Dorothy Louise McIntosh to Oscar Lewis, a blacksmith for a coal mine, and Daisy Grace McIntosh on August 14, 1929, in Lynch, Kentucky, a coal mining town built by a subsidiary of US Steel.

FactSnippet No. 153,256

10. Louise Slaughter is one of several Democratic congressmen who post at Daily Kos, a Democratic-oriented blog.

FactSnippet No. 153,252

11. Louise Slaughter is one of the most liberal and progressive members of the New York congressional delegation from upstate New York, and in the 110th Congress, was the most progressive member of the entire House of Representatives according to the National Journal.

FactSnippet No. 153,251

12. Louise Slaughter was strongly critical of the Stupak-Pitts Amendment, which places limits on taxpayer-funding for elective abortions in the context of the November 2009 Affordable Health Care for America Act.

FactSnippet No. 153,250

13. In 2009, Louise Slaughter wrote to the United States Department of Defense requesting an investigation into faulty body armor after reading an article in The New York Times, entitled, The article authored by Michael Moss reported that up to 80 percent of Marines who were killed in Iraq from wounds to the upper body could have survived if they had extra body armor.

FactSnippet No. 153,249

14. Louise Slaughter declared that "the greatest thing she has done in her time in Congress" is passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008.

FactSnippet No. 153,248

15. In 1994, Louise Slaughter co-authored the Violence Against Women Act which is designed to reduce incidences of domestic violence in the United States and provide resources to victims.

FactSnippet No. 153,247

16. Since the retirement of Charles Rangel, Louise Slaughter has risen to dean of the New York House of Representatives delegation.

FactSnippet No. 153,244

17. Louise Slaughter was a superdelegate to the 2016 Democratic National Convention from New York.

FactSnippet No. 153,242

18. Louise Slaughter voted with the Democratic Party 93.3 percent of the time, which ranked 76th among the 201 House Democratic members as of June 2013.

FactSnippet No. 153,241

19. Louise Slaughter voted with the Democratic Party 91.8 percent of the time, which ranked 135th among the 204 House Democratic members as of August 2014.

FactSnippet No. 153,240

20. Louise Slaughter paid her congressional staff a total of $1,070,488 in 2011.

FactSnippet No. 153,239

21. Louise Slaughter ranked as the 116th most wealthy representative in 2012.

FactSnippet No. 153,237

22. Louise Slaughter was re-elected to the US House in 2010 for a thirteenth term.

FactSnippet No. 153,236

23. Louise Slaughter spent $8.23 per general election vote received in 2014.

FactSnippet No. 153,235

24. Louise Slaughter spent $8.68 per general election vote received in 2016.

FactSnippet No. 153,234

25. On November 4, 1986, Louise Slaughter won election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,233

26. On November 8, 1988, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,232

27. On November 6, 1990, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,231

28. On November 3, 1992, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,230

29. On November 8, 1994, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,229

30. On November 5, 1996, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,228

31. On November 3, 1998, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,227

32. On November 7, 2000, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,226

33. On November 5, 2002, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,225

34. On November 2, 2004, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,224

35. On November 7, 2006, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,223

36. On November 4, 2008, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,222

37. On November 2, 2010, Louise Slaughter won re-election to the United States House.

FactSnippet No. 153,221

38. Louise Slaughter has voted against all attempts to repeal or delay the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

FactSnippet No. 153,216

39. Louise Slaughter signed a letter sent to Collin Peterson in August 2013, asking him to keep Steve King's amendment out of the final Farm Bill.

FactSnippet No. 153,214

40. Louise Slaughter voted against the Farm Bill on July 11, 2013.

FactSnippet No. 153,213

41. Louise Slaughter voted in favor of House Amendment 69, which would have amended HR 3 to "require that the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, conduct a study of the vulnerabilities of the Keystone XL pipeline to a terrorist attack and certify that necessary protections have been put in place.

FactSnippet No. 153,211

42. Louise Slaughter voted with 78 Democrats and 37 Republicans against the bill.

FactSnippet No. 153,208

43. Louise Slaughter was one of 175 Democrats to vote in favor of HR 1295.

FactSnippet No. 153,206

44. Louise Slaughter was one of 158 Democrats to vote against the amendment.

FactSnippet No. 153,205

45. Louise Slaughter was one of 157 Democrats to vote against the measure.

FactSnippet No. 153,204

46. Louise Slaughter was one of 144 Democrats to vote against the bill.

FactSnippet No. 153,203

47. Louise Slaughter was a member of a variety of congressional caucuses.

FactSnippet No. 153,200 - en.wikipedia.org

48. Louise Slaughter was one of several Democratic members of Congress who posted at Daily Kos, a Democratic-oriented blog.

FactSnippet No. 153,199 - en.wikipedia.org

49. Louise Slaughter was one of the most liberal and progressive members of the New York congressional delegation from upstate New York, and in the 110th Congress, was the most progressive member of the entire House of Representatives according to the National Journal.

FactSnippet No. 153,198 - en.wikipedia.org

50. In 2011, Louise Slaughter secured $62.5 million in federal funding for the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at University of Rochester.

FactSnippet No. 153,197 - en.wikipedia.org

51. In March 2010, Louise Slaughter proposed that a House rule be passed to expedite the passage of health care reform legislation.

FactSnippet No. 153,196 - en.wikipedia.org

52. Louise Slaughter was chairwoman of the United States House Committee on Rules during the writing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and managed the rule for the legislation on the House Floor.

FactSnippet No. 153,195 - en.wikipedia.org

53. In 2009, Louise Slaughter wrote to the United States Department of Defense requesting an investigation into faulty body armor after reading an article in The New York Times, entitled, "Pentagon Study Links Fatalities to Body Armor.

FactSnippet No. 153,194 - en.wikipedia.org

54. Louise Slaughter strongly supported the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008.

FactSnippet No. 153,193 - en.wikipedia.org

55. In 2007, Louise Slaughter introduced the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act, which would limit the use of antibiotics in livestock feed, to counter the threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

FactSnippet No. 153,192 - en.wikipedia.org

56. In 1994, along with Senator Joe Biden, Louise Slaughter co-authored the Violence Against Women Act which is designed to reduce incidences of domestic violence in the United States and provide resources to victims.

FactSnippet No. 153,191 - en.wikipedia.org

57. Louise Slaughter fought to include language establishing an Office of Research on Women's Health at NIH in the legislation.

FactSnippet No. 153,190 - en.wikipedia.org

58. Louise Slaughter was a co-sponsor of the National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act of 1993, and fought to ensure the legislation included language guaranteeing that women and minorities were included in all federal health clinical trials from that point forward.

FactSnippet No. 153,189 - en.wikipedia.org

59. In the 2014 election, Louise Slaughter narrowly defeated her Republican opponent, Gates town supervisor Mark Assini, by 869 votes.

FactSnippet No. 153,188 - en.wikipedia.org

60. Louise Slaughter defeated Eckert by one point in the 1986 midterm election.

FactSnippet No. 153,187 - en.wikipedia.org

61. Louise Slaughter sat in the 185th and 186th New York State Legislatures.

FactSnippet No. 153,186 - en.wikipedia.org

62. Louise Slaughter challenged Hanna, and she won with 52 percent of the vote.

FactSnippet No. 153,185 - en.wikipedia.org

63. Louise Slaughter decided to run for the Monroe County Legislature, winning on her third try.

FactSnippet No. 153,184 - en.wikipedia.org

64. Louise Slaughter was born Dorothy Louise McIntosh on August 14, 1929, in Lynch, Kentucky, a coal mining town built by a subsidiary of US Steel.

FactSnippet No. 153,183 - en.wikipedia.org

65. At the time of her death, Louise Slaughter was the oldest sitting member of Congress and the last sitting member to have been born in the 1920s.

FactSnippet No. 153,182 - en.wikipedia.org

66. Louise Slaughter was the lead House sponsor of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which became law in 2008.

FactSnippet No. 153,181 - en.wikipedia.org

67. Louise Slaughter served as Chairwoman of the House Rules Committee from 2007 until 2011 and as ranking minority member of the Committee from 2005 to 2007, and from 2011 until her death.

FactSnippet No. 153,180 - en.wikipedia.org