59 Facts About Menachem Mendel Schneerson

1. Menachem Mendel Schneerson attracted members by using several strategies: converted campers that served as recruitment centres canvassed New York City; toll-free telephone numbers, satellite television hookups, and faxes of Talmudic disquisitions were made available; full-page newspaper advertisements were published; and Schneerson himself, a mesmeric figure with piercing blue eyes and a flowing white beard, dispensed blessings and a crisp new dollar bill to each Sunday morning visitor.

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2. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was no charlatan has since been proven beyond any doubt by the recent scholarship of Tomer Persico and Elliot Wolfson, who leave no question about the Rebbe's complete conviction that he was the Messiah.

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3. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was born on April 18, 1902 in the Black Sea port of Nikolaev in the Russian Empire.

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4. Menachem Mendel Schneerson, known to many as the Rebbe, was a Russian Empire-born American Orthodox Jewish rabbi, and the last Lubavitcher Rebbe.

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5. Menachem Mendel Schneerson had no children and named no successors, and that prompted many in the Hassidic community to speculate whether Schneerson was the Messiah.

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6. In 1986, Menachem Mendel Schneerson started one of his most famous efforts to cultivate kindness and giving.

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7. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was an important factor in Israeli elections, a voice of confidence in Israel's security, and an advisor to many of the country's major political leaders.

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8. Menachem Mendel Schneerson spoke strongly and confidently about the Israeli victory, though he preached that spiritual strength was more important than military strength.

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9. In 1960, Menachem Mendel Schneerson began using radio to teach the Torah.

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10. Menachem Mendel Schneerson addressed his teachings to both men and women, believing women had an important role in Jewish society.

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11. In 1953, Menachem Mendel Schneerson founded the Lubavitcher Women's Organization to train women as community leaders.

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12. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was appointed head of the movement's educational arm, its social service organization, and its publishing house.

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13. In 1923, Menachem Mendel Schneerson met Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak for the first time and joined him in his critical mission.

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14. At the age of five, Menachem Mendel Schneerson moved with his parents to the city of Yekatrinislav, where his father became the chief rabbi.

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15. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was born to an illustrious Jewish family on April 18, 1902, in Nikolaev, a town in Ukrainian Russia.

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16. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was the seventh rabbi of the Lubavitcher Hassidim.

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17. In 1983 Menachem Mendel Schneerson launched a global campaign to promote awareness of the Supreme Being and observance of the Noahide Laws among all people,[95] arguing that this was the basis for human rights for all civilization.

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18. Menachem Mendel Schneerson went on to receive separate rabbinical ordinations from the Rogatchover Gaon, Yosef Rosen,[33] and Yechiel Yaakov Weinberg, author of Sridei Aish.

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19. Menachem Mendel Schneerson, known to many as the Lubavitcher Rebbe or simply as the Rebbe,[2] [3] was a Russian Empire–born American Orthodox Jewish rabbi, and the last rebbe of the Lubavitcher Hasidic dynasty.

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20. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was criticized for his passion and desire to raise awareness of the coming of the Messiah.

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21. Menachem Mendel Schneerson penned tens of thousands of letters in reply to requests for blessings and advice.

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22. Menachem Mendel Schneerson is recognized for his scholarship and contributions to Talmudic, Halachic, Kabalistic and Chasidic teachings.

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23. Menachem Mendel Schneerson's published works fill more than 200 volumes and are often used as source text for sermons of both Chabad and non-Chabad rabbis.

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24. Menachem Mendel Schneerson sought to bring Judaism to Jews wherever they were and was the first person in all of history to try reach every Jewish community and every Jew in the world.

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25. Menachem Mendel Schneerson initiated Jewish outreach in the post-Holocaust era and believed that world Jewry was seeking to learn more about its heritage.

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26. Menachem Mendel Schneerson sent many emissaries on covert missions to sustain Judaism under communist regimes and to provide them with their religious and material needs.

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27. Menachem Mendel Schneerson corresponded with David Ben-Gurion on the issue of Judaism in the State of Israel, asking the Prime Minister to ensure that Israel "remains Jewish".

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28. Menachem Mendel Schneerson protested vehemently against those elements within the ultra-haredi society who sought to undermine the motivations and actions of the soldiers.

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29. Menachem Mendel Schneerson said Israel had no need to fear as God was with them, quoting the verse, "the Guardian of Israel neither sleeps nor slumbers".

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30. Menachem Mendel Schneerson publicly expressed his view that the safety and stability of Israel were in the best interests of the United States, calling Israel the front line against those who want the anti-Western nations to succeed.

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31. Menachem Mendel Schneerson established a network of trade schools in Israel to provide Israeli youth, new immigrants and Holocaust survivors with vocational training and livelihood.

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32. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was concerned with the agricultural, industrial and overall economic welfare of Israel, and sought to promote its scientific achievements, and enhance Israel's standing in the international community.

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33. Menachem Mendel Schneerson proclaimed 1977 as a "Year of Education" and urged Congress to do the same.

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34. Menachem Mendel Schneerson placed a strong emphasis on education and often spoke of the need of a moral educational system for all people.

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35. Menachem Mendel Schneerson called on the government to develop independent energy, and not need to rely on totalitarian regimes whose countries national interests greatly differed from the US Schneerson called for the US Government to use its influence on countries who were receiving its foreign aid to do more for the educational and cultural needs of their deprived citizens.

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36. Menachem Mendel Schneerson spoke of the position of the United States as a world superpower, and would praise its foundational values of '"E pluribus unum'—from many one", and "In God we trust".

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37. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was opposed to retirement, seeing it as a waste of precious years.

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38. Menachem Mendel Schneerson rarely left Brooklyn except for visits to his father-in-law's gravesite in Queens, New York.

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39. Menachem Mendel Schneerson replied that "'Ninety', in Hebrew, is 'tzaddik'; which means 'righteous.

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40. In 1986, Menachem Mendel Schneerson began a custom where each Sunday he would stand outside his office, greet people briefly, give them a dollar bill and encourage them to donate to the charity of their choice.

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41. In 1984, Menachem Mendel Schneerson initiated a campaign for the daily study of Maimonides's Mishneh Torah.

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42. In 1983 Menachem Mendel Schneerson launched a global campaign to promote awareness of the Supreme Being and observance of the Noahide Laws among all people, arguing that this was the basis for human rights for all civilization.

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43. In 1973, Menachem Mendel Schneerson started a Chanukah campaign to encourage all Jews worldwide to light their own menorah.

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44. Menachem Mendel Schneerson addressed meetings of the organisations, and led gatherings exclusively for women.

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45. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was reluctant, and actively refused to accept leadership of the movement.

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46. Menachem Mendel Schneerson published his own works including the Hayom Yom in 1943 and Hagadda in 1946.

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47. Menachem Mendel Schneerson continued studying mechanics and electrical engineering at the ESTP, a Grande ecole in the Montparnasse district and graduated in July 1937 with a degree.

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48. Menachem Mendel Schneerson wrote hundreds of pages of his own original Torah discourses, and conducted a serious interchange of halachic correspondence with many of Eastern Europe's leading rabbinic figures, including the talmudic genius known as the Rogachover Gaon.

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49. Menachem Mendel Schneerson studied mathematics, physics and philosophy at the University of Berlin.

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50. Menachem Mendel Schneerson would visit her every day and twice each Friday and prepare her a tea.

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51. In 1947 Menachem Mendel Schneerson traveled to Paris, to take his mother, Chana Schneerson, back to New York with him.

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52. Menachem Mendel Schneerson went on to receive separate rabbinical ordinations from the Rogatchover Gaon, Yosef Rosen, and Yechiel Yaakov Weinberg, author of Sridei Aish.

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53. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was said to have acted as an interpreter between the Jewish community and the Russian authorities on a number of occasions.

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54. Menachem Mendel Schneerson proved gifted in both Talmudic and Kabalistic study and took exams as an external student of the local Soviet school.

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55. Menachem Mendel Schneerson served until 1939, when he was exiled by the Soviets to Kazakhstan.

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56. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was named after the third Chabad rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, from whom he was a direct patrilineal descendent.

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57. Menachem Mendel Schneerson was born on April 18, 1902 (11 Nissan, 5662) in the Black Sea port of Nikolaev in the Russian Empire (now Mykolaiv in Ukraine).

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58. Menachem Mendel Schneerson is recognized as the pioneer of Jewish outreach.

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59. Menachem Mendel Schneerson, known to many as the Lubavitcher Rebbe or simply as the Rebbe, was a Russian Empire–born American Orthodox Jewish rabbi, and the last rebbe of the Lubavitcher Hasidic dynasty.

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