101 Facts About Zora Neale Hurston

1. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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2. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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3. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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4. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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5. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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6. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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7. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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8. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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9. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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10. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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11. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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12. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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13. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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14. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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15. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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16. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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17. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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18. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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19. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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20. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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21. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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22. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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23. Zora Neale Hurston is best known for "Their Eyes Were Watching God", her 1937 novel.

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24. Zora Neale Hurston marked the Fort Pierce grave of Zora Neale Hurston, who died in 1960, with a stone that reads "A Genius of the South.

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25. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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26. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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27. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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28. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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29. Zora Neale Hurston was a central figure of African-American literature and lived in the historic town of Eatonville most of her life.

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30. Zora Neale Hurston's would not "bow low before the white man", and claimed "adequate Negro schools" already existed in 1955.

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31. Zora Neale Hurston's voiced this opposition in a letter, "Court Order Can't Make the Races Mix", that was published in the Orlando Sentinel in August 1955.

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32. Zora Neale Hurston's shared his opposition to Roosevelt and Truman's interventionist foreign policy.

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33. Zora Neale Hurston's disagreed with the philosophies supported by many of her colleagues in the Harlem Renaissance, such as Langston Hughes, who was in the 1930s a supporter of the Soviet Union and praised it in several of his poems.

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34. Zora Neale Hurston's was a Republican who was generally sympathetic to the foreign policy non-interventionism of the Old Right and a fan of Booker T Washington's self-help politics.

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35. Zora Neale Hurston's died of hypertensive heart disease on January 28, 1960, and was buried at the Garden of Heavenly Rest in Fort Pierce, Florida.

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36. Zora Neale Hurston covered the appeal and second trial, and developed material from a background investigation.

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37. Zora Neale Hurston's used this material as well in fictional treatment developed for her novels such as Jonah's Gourd Vine.

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38. Zora Neale Hurston's lived in a cottage in Eau Gallie, Florida, twice: once in 1929 and again in 1951.

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39. Zora Neale Hurston's worked with Ruth Benedict as well as fellow anthropology student Margaret Mead.

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40. Zora Neale Hurston's graduated from the high school of Morgan State University in 1918.

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41. Zora Neale Hurston's described it as a kind of "birth".

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42. Zora Neale Hurston's was born in Notasulga, Alabama, on January 7, 1891, where her father grew up and her grandfather was the preacher of a Baptist church.

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43. Zora Neale Hurston was the sixth of eight children of John Hurston and Lucy Ann Hurston.

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44. Zora Neale Hurston was surrounded by successful African Americans at an early age.

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45. Zora Neale Hurston was an African American writer who lived mainly during the 1900s.

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46. Zora Neale Hurston wrote Their Eyes in 1937 in only seven weeks while doing anthropological research in Haiti.

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47. Zora Neale Hurston was "a product of the Harlem Renaissance", an African-American political and artistic movement that took place in Harlem, New York in the 1920s, "as well as one of its most.

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48. On January 7, 1891, Zora Neale Hurston was born in the tiny town of Notasulga, Alabama.

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49. Zora Neale Hurston broke literary norms by focusing her work on the experience of a black woman.

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50. Zora Neale Hurston was an active student and participated in student government.

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51. In 1917, Zora Neale Hurston enrolled at Morgan College, where she completed her high school studies.

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52. Zora Neale Hurston was born in Notasulga, Alabama on January 15, 1891.

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53. Zora Neale Hurston influenced many writers, forever cementing her place in history as one of the foremost female writers of the 20th century.

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54. Zora Neale Hurston was a famous black author who was associated with the Harlem Renaissance, many readers assume that Their Eyes Were Watching God is concerned primarily with issues of race.

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55. Zora Neale Hurston was talking about Zore Neale Hurston, whose 1937 novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God is a big read selection.

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56. Zora Neale Hurston, known for her audacious spirit and sharp wit, was a talented and prolific writer and a skilled anthropologist from the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Era.

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57. Zora Neale Hurston struggled financially all her life, never earning more than $943.75 in royalties from any single book.

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58. Zora Neale Hurston would never had died penniless and unknown if she had lived in the age of Oprah.

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59. Zora Neale Hurston progressed with her writing works in establishing journals such as The Saturday Evening Post and The American Mercury.

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60. Zora Neale Hurston was a remarkable Folklorist, anthropologist, activist and most of all 16th-century authors.

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61. Zora Neale Hurston worked on and off as a maid near the end of her life, and she died in poverty in 1960.

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62. Zora Neale Hurston was an African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, and anthropologist known for her contributions to African-American literature, her portrayal of racial struggles in the American South, and works documenting her research on Haitian voodoo.

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63. Zora Neale Hurston passed away after a series of strokes in 1960 in Florida.

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64. Zora Neale Hurston wrote a number of critically-acclaimed novels including Jonah's Gourd Vine, Seraph on the Suwanee, and her most famous novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, which told the story of Janie Crawford over twenty years and charted Janie's growth toward becoming a loving, independent, and self-confident human being.

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65. Zora Neale Hurston continued further studies in anthropology at other schools including Barnard College, a women's college in New York, and Columbia, another university in New York.

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66. Zora Neale Hurston studied anthropology, which is a field of study about human beings and how they live, interact, and form societies.

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67. Zora Neale Hurston was born in 1891 in Alabama, where she attended school until the age of thirteen.

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68. Zora Neale Hurston had attended the school, then known as Morgan Academy, in 1917.

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69. Zora Neale Hurston viewed her work as distinct from the work of fellow Harlem Renaissance writers she described as the "sobbing school of Negrohood" that portrayed the lives of black people as constantly miserable, downtrodden and deprived.

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70. Zora Neale Hurston's writing career began not long after she left home.

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71. Zora Neale Hurston was a famous folklorist who applied her academic training to collecting African American folklore around her home-town in Florida.

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72. Zora Neale Hurston began her writing career while at Howard when she wrote her first short story for Stylus, a college literary magazine.

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73. Zora Neale Hurston found herself being passed from relative to relative, while working as a nanny and a housekeeper.

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74. Zora Neale Hurston was born on January 7, 1903, in Eatonville, Florida, to Reverend John and Lucy Hurston.

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75. Zora Neale Hurston was born on January 7, 1891 in Notasulga, Alabama.

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76. Zora Neale Hurston was buried at an unmarked grave in Fort Pierce, Florida.

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77. In 1925, Zora Neale Hurston moved to New York where she enrolled in Barnard College to study under Franz Boas who was a significant figure involved in the founding of the subject of anthropology.

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78. On January 28, 1960, Zora Neale Hurston died and was buried in an unmarked grave in Fort Pierce, Florida.

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79. Zora Neale Hurston spent late 1940 and early 1941 in southern California, living with a wealthy friend while writing her autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road.

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80. Zora Neale Hurston spent the next several years touring with musical shows based on her stories, including From Sun to Sun and The Great Day, which were performed in Florida and in Chicago, Illinois.

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81. Zora Neale Hurston worked for part of 1932 at Rollins College, a black school located in Winter Park, Florida, that hired her to organize a concert program of African American arts.

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82. Zora Neale Hurston found it difficult to get her material published, though, and she finally broke off her relationship with Mason after finding the older woman too controlling.

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83. Zora Neale Hurston arrived in the black community of Harlem in early 1925.

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84. Zora Neale Hurston was born in the central Florida town of Eatonville, which was one of the first in the United States to be incorporated as an all-black town.

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85. Zora Neale Hurston was a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance, one of the most important cultural movements of the Roaring Twenties.

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86. Zora Neale Hurston had experienced poor health for many years, and in October of 1958 she had a stroke and was forced to enter the Saint Lucie Country Welfare Home, which provided long-term care for low-income people.

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87. Zora Neale Hurston continued to live mostly in Florida, and especially enjoyed traveling up and down the Halifax and Indian rivers on her houseboat Wanago.

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88. At this point Zora Neale Hurston began to be courted by magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post and Reader's Digest for contributions.

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89. Zora Neale Hurston spent a short period from late 1940 to early 1941 living in California with a wealthy friend, Katharine Mershon, and working on her autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road, which was published in 1942.

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90. Zora Neale Hurston shaped her novel as an allegory of African American oppression by whites.

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91. Zora Neale Hurston published the results of her work in Tell My Horse.

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92. Zora Neale Hurston spent the next few years touring with several musical revues that were based on the folktales she had gathered, including Sun to Sun, The Great Day, and Singing Steel (both of which appeared in Chicago).

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93. Zora Neale Hurston spent the next three years traveling—mostly in Alabama and Florida—and collected a huge amount of folklore, including songs, stories, and a careful record of the slang and figures of speech used by southern blacks.

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94. Zora Neale Hurston would receive two hundred dollars a month as well as a movie camera and a Ford automobile; she was to travel in the South and collect folklore, then report back to Mason with all the materials she had gathered.

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95. Zora Neale Hurston was born in the all-black town of Eatonville, Florida, located about five miles from the larger city of Orlando.

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96. Zora Neale Hurston tells their tales simply to chronicle their existence in this town and thereby to take Eatonville and its inhabitants on a pilgrimage into literature.

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97. Zora Neale Hurston attended Howard University in Washington, DC, sporadically between 1919 and 1925, and published her first short story, "John Redding Goes to Sea", in Stylus, the university literary magazine.

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98. Zora Neale Hurston graduated from Barnard College with a bachelor's degree in 1928.

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99. Zora Neale Hurston spent most of her childhood in Eatonville, whence she drew much of her literary inspiration.

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100. Zora Neale Hurston was a folklorist, fiction writer, playwright, and essayist.

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101. Zora Neale Hurston wrote in her autobiography that what she wanted to write was a story about a man, but from what she had read and heard, "Negroes were supposed to write about the Race problem.

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