76 Facts About Casey Stengel

1. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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2. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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3. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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4. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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5. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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6. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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7. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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8. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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9. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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10. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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11. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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12. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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13. Casey Stengel died of lymphatic cancer in Glendale, California on September 29, 1975.

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14. Casey Stengel turned down an offer to manage the Detroit Tigers.

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15. In 1958, Casey Stengel testified before a United States Senate committee which was investigating baseball's anti-trust exemption.

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16. Casey Stengel often performed clubhouse routines, practical jokes and pantomimes, one time sliding across a Detroit hotel lobby to illustrate his game-winning 1923 Series home run.

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17. Casey Stengel was a clownish philosopher who proved winning and having fun were compatible.

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18. In 1938, Casey Stengel began a six-year stint with the Boston Braves, but the club finished seventh four years in a row.

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19. In 1925, Casey Stengel took his first managerial job, at Worcester in the Eastern League.

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20. Casey Stengel poured his fatherly instincts into working with hundreds of young players.

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21. In 1924, Casey Stengel married Edna Lawson, an accountant he met at a ball game in 1923.

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22. Casey Stengel retired as a player in 1925, ending a career during which he batted.

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23. In 1921, Casey Stengel was being traded to the powerhouse New York Giants.

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24. In 1919, Casey Stengel was playing for Pittsburgh at Ebbets Field.

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25. Casey Stengel debuted in the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers near the end of the 1912 season.

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26. Casey Stengel spent five years in the minor leagues, playing for four teams.

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27. Casey Stengel became the most popular and influential manager in baseball, a star in New York City and a national celebrity.

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28. In 1962, at age 72, Casey Stengel was called on to manage the new Metropolitan Baseball Club of New York, better known as the Mets.

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29. Casey Stengel stayed with the Mets until 1965, when he broke his hip and was forced to retire, at age 75.

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30. Casey Stengel is said to have built his team around the powerhouse hitter and lightning-fast runner, along with Berra and Ford.

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31. In 1921, Casey Stengel was traded to the New York Giants, where he would play for John McGraw, his greatest teacher and the manager by whom Stengel would set his standards in the future.

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32. Casey Stengel started the Yankees' "instructional school", a training camp that soon came to be emulated by other major league teams.

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33. Casey Stengel was known for his showmanship and his misuse of the English language, called "Stengelese".

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34. Casey Stengel was sometimes considered thoughtless or even cruel towards his players.

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35. Casey Stengel had poor relations with Robinson; each disliked the other and was a vocal critic.

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36. Casey Stengel was the booster that got them off the ground and on their journey.

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37. Casey Stengel remains the only manager to lead his club to victory in five consecutive World Series.

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38. Casey Stengel often rotated infielders between positions, with the Yankees having no real regular second baseman or shortstop between 1954 and 1958.

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39. Casey Stengel reintroduced it to the Yankees, and its prominent use amid the team's success caused it to be imitated by other teams.

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40. Casey Stengel is the only person to have played or managed for the home team in five New York City major league venues: Washington Park, Ebbets Field, the Polo Grounds, Shea Stadium and the original Yankee Stadium.

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41. Casey Stengel was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1981.

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42. Casey Stengel had his uniform number, 37, retired by both the Yankees and the Mets.

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43. Casey Stengel accepted and attended, and Stengel became the fifth Yankee to have his number retired.

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44. Casey Stengel participated in Old-Timers' Day at a number of ballparks, including, regularly, Shea Stadium.

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45. Casey Stengel tried incessantly to promote the Mets, talking to reporters or anyone else who would listen.

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46. Casey Stengel came from the dugout to argue, only to be told that Throneberry had missed second base as well.

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47. Casey Stengel hoped to overcome the challenge of attracting supporters to a losing team in the "City of Winners" by drafting well-known players who would draw fans to the Polo Grounds, where the Mets would initially play.

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48. Casey Stengel spent the summer of 1961 as vice president of the Glendale Valley National Bank, which was owned by members of Edna Stengel's family.

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49. Casey Stengel turned down several job offers, to manage the Tigers, San Francisco Giants and the expansion Los Angeles Angels.

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50. Casey Stengel was delighted with the acquisition and batted Maris third in the lineup, just in front of Mantle, and the new Yankee responded with an MVP season in 1960.

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51. Casey Stengel stated in an interview, "We're going to have Burditis on our minds next year".

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52. Casey Stengel was close to Martin, who took great pride in being a Yankee, and Topping and Weiss did not involve the manager in the trade talks that ensued.

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53. Casey Stengel lectured the team before Game 3 at Yankee Stadium and the team responded with a victory then and in Game 4.

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54. In spite of the defeat, Casey Stengel was given a new two-year contract at $75,000 per year.

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55. Casey Stengel prepared nearly 100 different lineup cards for the 1952 season.

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56. Casey Stengel moved Mantle from right to center field in DiMaggio's place.

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57. The Yankees and Casey Stengel had their third straight World Series championship.

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58. Casey Stengel moved Mantle from shortstop to the outfield, reasoning that Rizzuto, the shortstop, was likely to play several more years.

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59. Casey Stengel considered DiMaggio's decline in play as he neared the end of his stellar career more important than his resentment.

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60. Casey Stengel was more forceful in running the team, not always to the liking of veteran players such as DiMaggio and Phil Rizzuto.

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61. Casey Stengel tried to keep a low profile during the 1949 Yankee spring training at St Petersburg, Florida, but there was considerable media attention as Stengel shuttled rookies from one position on the field to another, and endlessly shuffled his lineup.

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62. Casey Stengel was introduced as Yankee manager on October 12, 1948, the 25th anniversary of his second World Series home run to beat the Yankees.

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63. Casey Stengel managed the Oaks for a third year in 1948, with the roster heavy with former major leaguers.

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64. Casey Stengel was both manager and an investor in the Braves.

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65. Casey Stengel considered going in the oil business full-time, but Braves president Bob Quinn offered him the Boston managerial job in late 1937, and he accepted.

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66. Casey Stengel was still under contract, and Fuchs refused to release him.

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67. Casey Stengel was obviously limping when he was advanced to second base on another single, and McGraw sent in a pinch runner.

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68. The only contribution Casey Stengel made to the box score was being ejected from Game 5 for arguing.

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69. Casey Stengel met with the Pirates owner Barney Dreyfuss to seek a salary increase, but found Dreyfuss reluctant to deal until Stengel proved himself as a Pirate.

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70. Casey Stengel reported to spring training ill and thin; he was unable to work out for much of the time the Dodgers spent in Florida.

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71. Casey Stengel avoided a holdout in 1914; Dodgers owner Charlie Ebbets was anxious to put his players under contract lest they jump to the new Federal League, and nearly doubled Stengel's salary to $4,000 per year.

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72. Casey Stengel failed to make the ball club, which was part of the American Association, considered one of the top minor leagues.

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73. Casey Stengel was offered a contract by the minor league Kansas City Blues for $135 a month, more money than his father was making.

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74. Casey Stengel played on the traveling team called the Kansas City Red Sox during the summers of 1908 and 1909, going as far west as Wyoming and earning a dollar a day.

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75. Casey Stengel is remembered as one of the great characters in baseball history.

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76. Casey Stengel was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966.

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