101 Facts About New Jersey

1. New Jersey is the only state in the nation where elected county officials are called "Freeholders", governing each county as part of its own Board of Chosen Freeholders.

FactSnippet No. 834,969 - en.wikipedia.org

2. New Jersey lies completely within the combined statistical areas of New York City and Philadelphia and was the second-wealthiest US state by median household income as of 2017.

FactSnippet No. 834,968 - en.wikipedia.org

3. New Jersey has become the second state to require public schools to teach LGBT and disability-inclusive material.

FactSnippet No. 802,168

4. New Jersey is the only state in the nation where elected county officials are called "Freeholders", governing each county as part of its own Board of Chosen Freeholders.

FactSnippet No. 802,166 - en.wikipedia.org

5. New Jersey was an important state during the Revolutionary War because of its location near the center of the thirteen colonies and between New York City and Philadelphia.

FactSnippet No. 771,706

6. In fact, New Jersey issued begging licenses to the poor people because the New Jersey government funds were being exhausted.

FactSnippet No. 771,702 - en.wikipedia.org

7. New Jersey was a center of shipbuilding and manufacturing during World War I Existing factories such as the Singer Company in Elizabeth, New Jersey were converted to making weapon parts.

FactSnippet No. 771,701 - en.wikipedia.org

8. New Jersey was the last northern state to abolish slavery completely, and by the close of the Civil War, about a dozen African-Americans in New Jersey were still apprenticed freedmen.

FactSnippet No. 771,700 - en.wikipedia.org

9. Economy of New Jersey was largely based on agriculture, but crop failures and poor soil plagued the settlers of New Jersey.

FactSnippet No. 771,699 - en.wikipedia.org

10. New Jersey currently has four major league teams based in the state, although only one, the National Hockey League's New Jersey Devils, bears the state's name.

FactSnippet No. 771,693 - en.wikipedia.org

11. New Jersey is the only state in the nation where elected county officials are called "Freeholders", governing each county as part of its own Board of Chosen Freeholders.

FactSnippet No. 771,692 - en.wikipedia.org

12. Thus, the last year when New Jersey elected a Governor was 2017; the next gubernatorial election will occur in 2021.

FactSnippet No. 771,691 - en.wikipedia.org

13. New Jersey is known for several foods developed within the region, including Taylor Ham, cheesesteaks, and scrapple.

FactSnippet No. 771,689 - en.wikipedia.org

14. Center of population for New Jersey is located in Middlesex County, in the town of Milltown, just east of the New Jersey Turnpike.

FactSnippet No. 771,688 - en.wikipedia.org

15. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017, and the most densely populated of the 50 US states; its biggest city is Newark.

FactSnippet No. 771,687 - en.wikipedia.org

16. Throughout the colonial period New Jersey remained one of the most diverse colonies in British America.

FactSnippet No. 171,146

17. New Jersey became a royal province in 1702 when the proprietorships of East Jersey and West Jersey were brought under the control of the English crown.

FactSnippet No. 171,145

18. New Jersey is one of the leading states in the production of chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

FactSnippet No. 171,144

19. In 2000, New Jersey surpassed Connecticut as the state with the highest per capita income.

FactSnippet No. 171,143

20. New Jersey suffered through unemployment and economic hardship during the Great Depression.

FactSnippet No. 171,142

21. New Jersey became the home of many large industrial businesses.

FactSnippet No. 171,141

22. New Jersey has warm-to-hot summers and cold winters, with more moderate temperatures along the coast.

FactSnippet No. 171,139

23. New Jersey has more than 800 lakes and ponds, and its many rivers provide power for the state's large cities, which include Newark, Paterson, Elizabeth, Trenton, and Camden.

FactSnippet No. 171,138

24. New Jersey has a 130-mile coastline on the Atlantic Ocean.

FactSnippet No. 171,137

25. New Jersey was officially declared "urban" by the US Census Bureau in 1880, when the state population rose above one million for the first time.

FactSnippet No. 171,136

26. New Jersey has several world class golf courses, including Baltusrol, the site of seven US Opens and the 2005 PGA Championship.

FactSnippet No. 171,134

27. New Jersey is historically significant in the births of two major national sports.

FactSnippet No. 171,133

28. New Jersey has more than 177 museums, historic sites, botanical gardens, and arboretums.

FactSnippet No. 171,132

29. In 2001, New Jersey had 309 public library systems with a total of 458 libraries, 149 of which were branches.

FactSnippet No. 171,131

30. In 2004, New Jersey had 333 doctors per 100,000 residents, and 928 nurses per 100,000 residents in 2005.

FactSnippet No. 171,129

31. In 2005, New Jersey exported $21.08 billion of its own manufactures to foreign countries.

FactSnippet No. 171,127

32. In 2004, New Jersey had a commercial fish catch of 185.6 million pounds worth $139.4 million, the eighth-highest catch value in the nation.

FactSnippet No. 171,124

33. In 2004, New Jersey ranked fourth among the 50 states and the District of Columbia with a per capita income of $41,626 (the national average was $33,050).

FactSnippet No. 171,123

34. In 2005, New Jersey had a gross state product of $431 billion, eighth highest in the nation.

FactSnippet No. 171,122

35. In 2004, New Jersey had a total violent crime rate of 355.7 reported incidents per 100,000 persons.

FactSnippet No. 171,121

36. In 1993, New Jersey elected its first woman as governor, Republican Christine Todd Whitman.

FactSnippet No. 171,120

37. New Jersey has experienced many of the problems of urbanization.

FactSnippet No. 171,116

38. New Jersey is one of the most ethnically diverse states in the nation.

FactSnippet No. 171,113

39. In 2006, New Jersey ranked 11th population among the 50 states with an estimated total of 8,724,560 residents.

FactSnippet No. 171,112

40. In 2003, New Jersey had 551 hazardous waste sites listed in the Environmental Protection Agency's database, 113 of which were on the National Priorities List in 2006.

FactSnippet No. 171,110

41. New Jersey rapidly became the center for many research laboratories during this time, which helped creation of a number of affluent areas such as Bergen County.

FactSnippet No. 171,103

42. New Jersey was the third state to ratify the Constitution of the United States.

FactSnippet No. 171,101

43. New Jersey sends 12 representatives and 2 senators to the US Congress and has 14 electoral votes.

FactSnippet No. 171,099

44. New Jersey is linked to Delaware and Pennsylvania by many bridges across the Delaware River.

FactSnippet No. 171,098

45. New Jersey has been a leader in industrial research and development since the establishment in 1876 of Thomas Edison's research facility in Menlo Park.

FactSnippet No. 171,097

46. New Jersey attempted to improve its battered image by opening of the Garden State Arts Center and the Meadowlands sports complex.

FactSnippet No. 171,094

47. New Jersey is historically significant for the births of two major national sports.

FactSnippet No. 171,089

48. New Jersey has several world-class golf courses, including Baltusrol, the site of seven US Opens and the 2005 PGA Championship.

FactSnippet No. 171,088

49. New Jersey Nets have made a surge in the recent past, becoming one of the most successful teams in the NBA.

FactSnippet No. 171,087

50. New Jersey hosts the Liberty Science Center with ferry rides to the Statue of Liberty.

FactSnippet No. 171,086

51. New Jersey has not been known for having a very powerful press.

FactSnippet No. 171,084

52. New Jersey has more than 177 museums, historic sites, botanical gardens and arboretums.

FactSnippet No. 171,082

53. In 2005, New Jersey had 58 degree-granting institutions including, 14 public four-year schools, 19 public two-year schools, and 21 nonprofit, private four-year schools.

FactSnippet No. 171,080

54. In 2003, New Jersey had 78 community hospitals with about 22,800 beds.

FactSnippet No. 171,077

55. In the fiscal year 2007 federal budget, New Jersey was slated to receive: $110.5 million in State Children's Health Insurance Program funds to help the state provide health coverage to low-income, uninsured children who do not qualify for Medicaid.

FactSnippet No. 171,074

56. In 2005, New Jersey exported $21.08 billion to foreign countries.

FactSnippet No. 171,072

57. In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, New Jersey was listed as having 34,741 retail establishments with sales of $102.1 billion.

FactSnippet No. 171,071

58. In 2004, a total of 308,566 people in New Jersey were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM.

FactSnippet No. 171,069

59. New Jersey has no known proven reserves or production of crude oil and natural gas.

FactSnippet No. 171,067

60. In 2005, New Jersey had an estimated 44,000 cattle and calves, valued at $48.8 million.

FactSnippet No. 171,062

61. In 2004, New Jersey produced 265,140 tons of fresh market vegetables.

FactSnippet No. 171,061

62. New Jersey is a leading producer of fresh fruits and vegetables.

FactSnippet No. 171,060

63. New Jersey is one of 28 states that does not have a right-to-work law.

FactSnippet No. 171,058

64. In 2003, New Jersey spent $272,195,275 on homeland security, an average of $32 per state resident.

FactSnippet No. 171,053

65. In 1993, New Jersey elected its first woman as governor, Republican Christine Todd Whitman; she was reelected in 1997.

FactSnippet No. 171,049

66. In 2005, New Jersey had a total of 389 public and private-use aviation-related facilities.

FactSnippet No. 171,041

67. New Jersey is one of the most ethnically heterogeneous states.

FactSnippet No. 171,038

68. In 2004, New Jersey ranked first in the nation for the highest number of sites on the National Priorities List.

FactSnippet No. 171,036

69. New Jersey is bordered on the n and ne by New York State; on the e by the Atlantic Ocean; on the s and sw by Delaware (with the line passing through Delaware Bay); and on the w by Pennsylvania (separated by the Delaware River).

FactSnippet No. 171,031

70. New Jersey extends 166 mi n-s; the extreme width e-w is 57 mi (92 km).

FactSnippet No. 171,030

71. New Jersey would be the third state to join the United States of America and the first to approve the Bill of Rights.

FactSnippet No. 171,027

72. New Jersey took part in the American Revolutionary War, and was a scene of battles.

FactSnippet No. 171,026

73. New Jersey was part of the area known at this time as New Netherland.

FactSnippet No. 171,025

74. New Jersey is well known for its beaches, industries, swamps, and pine forests.

FactSnippet No. 171,024

75. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state, but has the eleventh-highest number of people.

FactSnippet No. 171,023

76. New Jersey is one of the 50 states of the United States of America.

FactSnippet No. 171,021

77. New Jersey known as the "Garden State" is a leading grower of produce.

FactSnippet No. 171,018

78. New Jersey is home to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

FactSnippet No. 171,017

79. New Jersey has the most diners in the world and is sometimes referred to as the Diner Capital of the World.

FactSnippet No. 171,016

80. New Jersey has been the home and inspiration for a large number of popular musicians.

FactSnippet No. 171,009

81. New Jersey helped correct that situation with the 1968 opening, in Holmdel, of the Garden State Arts Center.

FactSnippet No. 171,007

82. New Jersey has one of the country's highest rates of union membership among employed workers.

FactSnippet No. 171,003

83. New Jersey has continued to attract many industries, especially corporate headquarters from New York City, largely through its greater space, better transportation, and favourable tax rates.

FactSnippet No. 171,000

84. New Jersey was a prime destination for the waves of African Americans who left the South during and after World War II; more than one-tenth of the state's total population is made up of African Americans.

FactSnippet No. 170,997

85. New Jersey is called the Garden State because it became famous in the 18th century for the fertility of its land.

FactSnippet No. 170,994

86. New Jersey is a state in the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic regions of the United States.

FactSnippet No. 170,983

87. New Jersey is the world leader in blueberry production, and its tomatoes are world famous.

FactSnippet No. 170,982

88. New Jersey borders Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York, as well as the Atlantic Ocean on the east.

FactSnippet No. 170,980

89. New Jersey has 21 counties, including Hunterdon County, which is the 3rd-richest county in the country.

FactSnippet No. 170,979

90. New Jersey has the most diners in the world and is often referred to as the �Diner Capital of the World.

FactSnippet No. 170,978

91. New Jersey is one of only two states where self-service filling of gasoline is prohibited.

FactSnippet No. 170,977

92. New Jersey had no Lieutenant Governor position at the time, leaving a vacancy in the office.

FactSnippet No. 170,975 - en.wikipedia.org

93. New Jersey was the first state to ratify Prohibition, which restricted the purchasing and selling of alcohol.

FactSnippet No. 170,972 - en.wikipedia.org

94. New Jersey was one of the few states to favor Stephen Douglas over Abraham Lincoln in the Presidential Election of 1860.

FactSnippet No. 170,970 - en.wikipedia.org

95. New Jersey is referred to as the "Crossroads of the Revolution" because the British and Continental armies fought several crucial battles there.

FactSnippet No. 170,966 - en.wikipedia.org

96. New Jersey was one of the original thirteen colonies that joined in the struggle for independence from Great Britain.

FactSnippet No. 170,965 - en.wikipedia.org

97. Part of southwestern New Jersey was settled by the Swedes by the mid-17th century.

FactSnippet No. 170,961 - en.wikipedia.org

98. New Jersey became one of the Thirteen Colonies which broke away from Britain in the American Revolution, adopting the Declaration of Independence in 1776.

FactSnippet No. 170,959 - en.wikipedia.org

99. Story of the area of present-day New Jersey begins at the end of the Younger Dryas, about 15,000 years ago.

FactSnippet No. 170,958 - en.wikipedia.org

100. New Jersey has the most dense system of highways and railways in the United States.

FactSnippet No. 170,957

101. New Jersey owes much of its cuisine to Jewish and Italian immigrants, but the pork roll is a Garden State original.

FactSnippet No. 170,956